rawbee

Summer, New York City.  (at Le Bain at The Standard, High Line)

Summer, New York City. (at Le Bain at The Standard, High Line)

Saturday afternoon at the oval office. (at Icahn Stadium)

Saturday afternoon at the oval office. (at Icahn Stadium)

This video affected me so much. I was inspired by Imaginary Forces to be agile, technical and artistic.

"Just make something good… Do it. Go ahead." 

Also, I still use the test of time to judge anything I’ve ever worked on.

My favorite @dominiqueansel #cronut flavor so far: Milk & Honey. Thanks @alexltween!!!

My favorite @dominiqueansel #cronut flavor so far: Milk & Honey. Thanks @alexltween!!!

Pass the Baton. Last night @BlackRosesNYC with @ResidentRunners for Night At The Races. We had two 10x1000m relay teams where each of the 10 runners sprint all out for 200m five times. It was intense, chaotic, and a lot of fun. Photo by @zhetrick (at New Balance Track & Field Center at The Armory)

Pass the Baton. Last night @BlackRosesNYC with @ResidentRunners for Night At The Races. We had two 10x1000m relay teams where each of the 10 runners sprint all out for 200m five times. It was intense, chaotic, and a lot of fun. Photo by @zhetrick (at New Balance Track & Field Center at The Armory)

Why Your Phone Doesn’t Need to be Stolen.

Computerworld:

The Starbucks mobile app, the most used mobile-payment app in the U.S., has been storing usernames, email addresses and passwords in clear text, Starbucks executives confirmed late on Tuesday (Jan. 14). The credentials were stored in such a way that anyone with access to the phone can see the passwords and usernames by connecting the phone to a PC. No jailbreaking of the phone is necessary. And that clear text also displays an extensive list of geolocation tracking points (latitude, longitude), a treasure trove of security and privacy gems for anyone who steals the phone.

Troubling. At first glance, it’s tempting to think, “maybe it’s not that bad, someone would still have to steal my phone”. Not necessarily. I often see people (myself included) asking waiters, bartenders, and anybody who’s working anywhere to plug their phones in. They almost always oblige, taking the phone off somewhere and bringing it back when asked. Not that I think I’ve come across anyone that has done anything malicious, just pointing out an instance of vulnerability. I think that if the phone is passcode or fingerprint locked, the filesystem wouldn’t be accessible by a computer, but I’m not sure. In any case, be careful with your stuff and don’t do bad things with other people’s stuff!